Make Waves Teen Review

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald is about the ostentatious Jay Gatsby who is renowned in New York for his lavish parties and expensive entertainment. Despite his wide-spread popularity, very little is known about Gatsby, and his mysterious past is a popular topic among party-guests. As various events unfold, Gatsby’s story is slowly unveiled and then surprisingly concluded.

My first thought when I finished this book was, “what’s so great about Gatsby?” I would have understood the title if it was The Deluded Gatsby or The Glamorous Gatsby, but “great” is not the word I would use to describe the character of Gatsby. People may have called Gatsby “great” because he threw awesome parties, but in truth, he merely created an illusion of greatness. (Gatsby often didn’t even attend his own parties) Frankly, I thought that the “great” Gatsby was lame and depressing. He centered his entire life on trying to recreate the past and fulfill an impossible dream. What’s great about that?

Aside from the misnomer, my general opinion of this book is that it would be fantastic as a SAT vocabulary prep-book – the impressive wording and rich descriptions are definitely worth studying. Luckily, this book is shorter and more interesting than the actual SAT prep-book. The plot is slow to start at the beginning, but don’t be discouraged: The ending is truly exciting. (It involves dead people)
by Monika Williams

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3 thoughts on “Make Waves Teen Review

  1. You have noticed the irony in the title … the reader is meant to question how ‘great’ Gatsby is. This is a great novel that reflects the time Gatsby lived in, when things appeared better and bigger and ‘greater’ than they really were.
    And yes, it is worth reading all the way through to get to the ending!

    • Thank you for your insightful comment. I completely agree with what you say! I think that the “great” in the title is also supposed to draw attention to the fact that although everybody called Gatsby “great” and went to his parties, very few people sincerely cared about him.

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